Hover over projects for more information

Key

  • WANI demonstration projects
    • Mexico
    • Guatemala
    • El Salvador
    • Senegal
    • Ghana
    • Togo
    • Eygpt
    • Jordan
    • Palestine
    • Zambia
    • Uganda
    • Zimbabwe
    • Botswana
    • Pakistan
    • Nepal
    • Bhutan
    • Cambodia
    • Viet Nam
  • WANI-2 projects
    • Fiji
    • Samoa
  • Other countries with WANI projects
  • West African Dialogue on Dams
    • Mali
    • Burkina
    • Nigeria
  • Asia Eflows Network
    • India
    • Bangladesh
    • Thailand
    • Lao PDR
  • South American Eflows Network
    • Ecuador
    • Peru
    • Chile
    • Brazil
  • East African Eflows Network
    • Kenya
    • Tanzania
    • Mozambique
    • South Africa

Regions

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  • The project supported an assessment of the river’s flow patterns which led local, provincial and national authorities, along with local nongovernmental organizations, to incorporate the concept of “environmental flows” into planning and management of river basin development throughout Vietnam.

    Location:

    Hue province, Central Vietnam

    Area covered:

    2,830 km²

    Geography:

    It is characterised by a tropical monsoon climate with frequent flooding in the rainy season, and low river flows and seawater intrusion in the dry season. The upper reaches of the Huong River have a steep gradient until the river flows into a relatively flat flood plain.

    Management:

    IUCN worked with the government of Thua Thien Hue province and at the national level, the Department of Water Resources Management and Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment

    Start date:

    2002

    Outcomes

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  • El Imposible

    El Imposible

    The project aimed to coordinate the management of water resources in the basin, improve access, quality and distribution of water and ecosystem services, consolidate and interconnect the protected areas in the area, as a fundamental component of the hydrological unit, raise awareness and knowledge on the benefits of water resources and related ecosystems, establish partnerships to ensure the continuity of improved management and set in place a system for monitoring, evaluation and learning

    Location:

    Barra de Santiago – El Imposible, El Salvador

    Area covered:

    400 km²

    Management:

    IUCN is working in partnership with national partners, including the Directorate of Water Resources in Burkina Faso, the Water Resources Commission in Ghana.

  • Lake Tanganyika

    Lake Tanganyika

    Lake Tanganyika is a transboundary resource and the Lake Tanganyika Convention stipulates that the monitoring of this resource must be harmonized among the four riparian countries to facilitate their joint management of this shared resource. Ultimately, however, monitoring occurs in individual countries by national institutions. The challenge is to harmonize national monitoring programs among Tanganyika’s riparian States, so that they provide a platform for regional management of the Lake. The third result area aims to complete the preparatory steps in establishing effective and regionally harmonized monitoring and management programs in the four countries for water quality, fisheries & other biodiversity, invasive species and the Tanganyika catchment. Consolidated outputs will enable wider communication of the need for joint management and monitoring, the aims of the LTA and the urgency of better management in the basin.

    Location:

    Burundi (9%), Democratic Republic of Congo (43%), Tanzania (36%) and Zambia (12%)

    Area covered:

    32,900 km²

    Geography:

    The Lake’s main influent rivers are the Malagarasi, which enters the lake from the eastern side and the Rusizi which drains Lake Kivu and enters from the north. The Lake’ major outflow is the Lukuga River which feeds the Congo River System.

    Management:

    IUCN worked in partnership with the newly established Lake Tanganyika Authority

    Start date:

    2006

    Outcomes

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  • Senegal River

    Senegal River

    The project aimed to establish a participatory framework for the national integration of sustainable water resources and environment management. To build public participation and awareness, the project established a public participation and awareness program for broader community and civil society involvement in development actions in the Senegal river basin.

    Location:

    Guinea and Senegal

    Area covered:

    289,000 km²

    Geography:

    It flows from Fouta Djallon in Guinea to the shores of St-Louis (Atlantic) in Senegal, and also passes through Mauritania and Mali. There are two large dams on the Senegal river, the Diama on the river delta in Senegal and the Manantali in Mali.

    Management:

    IUCN worked with the World Bank and the GEF

    Start date:

    2004

    Outcomes

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  • Okavango

    Okavango

    The project is working to support the implementation of a management plan for the Delta. In addition support has been given to increase access to information through environmental and economic assessments and improve institutional coordination among government departments, and between community, basin and national levels.

    Location:

    In the northernmost edge of the Kalahari sandveld in north western Botswana.

    Area covered:

    55,599 km²

    Geography:

    The semi-arid region is characterized by cold, dry winters and hot, wet summers. The delta’s ecosystems range from perennial swamps to dryland areas, which include a large arid island (Chief’s Island) in the middle of the delta.

    Management:

    IUCN worked closely with the Government of Botswana and the University of Botswana

    Start date:

    2003

  • Limpopo

    Limpopo

    The project aimed to build awareness and capacity for an environmental flow assessment in the basin and to identify institutional and legal mechanisms for mainstreaming environmental flows in basin management in the region.

    Location:

    South Africa, Botswana, Zimbabwe, Mozambique

    Area covered:

    415,000 km²

    Geography:

    The Limpopo River Basin, one of the main transboundary river basins in the Southern Africa Development Community (SADC) region extends through Botswana, Zimbabwe, South Africa and Mozambique covering a total area of some 415,000 km2 and with a reach of approximately 1,700 kilometres.

    Management:

    IUCN worked with the Zimbabwe National Water Authority (ZINWA) and the Mzingwane Catchment Management Agency

    Start date:

    2005

    Outcomes

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  • Guayllabamba

    Guayllabamba

    Location:

    Ecuador

    Geography:

    The Guayllabamba Basin supplies the water for the city of Quito located downstream

    Outcomes

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  • Huasco

    Huasco

    The project is working to implement a regional environmental flows demonstration site so as to secure the livelihoods of people living in the area through the scaling-up of restoration and sustainable management of water resources and ecosystem services.

    Location:

    In the Atacama region of Chile.

    Area covered:

    9,850 km²

    Geography:

    The Huasco River begins at the confluence of the rivers Del Carmen and Del Tránsito. A small portion of its course is impounded by a small dam forming the Santa Juana Reservoir.

    Management:

    IUCN is working in partnership with the Water Center for Arid and Semi-Arid Zones in Latin America and the Caribbean (CAZALAC), the Regional Offices of the Environment Ministry and National Water Directorate.

    Start date:

    2009

  • Santa River

    Santa River

    The project is working to develop climate-resilient strategies for water management in the basin. Adaptation to climate change is being supported through participatory multi-stakeholder platforms.

    Location:

    Santa River Basin in Peru

    Area covered:

    15,000 km²

    Geography:

    The Rio Santa flows north through the Callejon de Huaylas valley, shadowed by the second highest mountain range in the world. Glaciers in the Cordillera Blanca make up around 70% of annual flow in the Rio Santa, and also drain east into the headwaters of the Amazon.

    Management:

    IUCN working the Huascaran Protected Area Office (under the Environment Ministry), The Mountain Institute and the National Water Authority

    Start date:

    2010

  • Himal Hindu-Kush

    Himal Hindu-Kush

    The project is working to demonstrate and scale up restoration and sustainable management of water resources and ecosystem services as a means to enhance the security of poor people and their livelihoods. A knowledge base will be created on risks and vulnerability and strategies for increased ecosystem and community resilience will be incorporated into an action plan.

    Location:

    Indian Himalayas

    Area covered:

    3,500 km²

    Geography:

    The Balkhila watershed descends from as high as 4,000 m among the peaks of the Himalayas. Drying of streams and springs has in turn led to lowering of the water table in wells so that acute water shortage now occurs in many areas around Gopeshwar.

    Management:

    IUCN worked in partnership with the Energy and Resources Institute (India), the International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD-Nepal) and Winrock (India).

    Start date:

    2004

    Outcomes

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  • Azraq Oasis

    Azraq Oasis

    This project is working to implement a series of developmental changes to the unique ecosystem, which is located in a fragile environment where the remaining wetland is recognized as a RAMSAR Site. These wetlands contain a wealth of biodiversity and habitats which are extremely rare in the region.

    Location:

    Jordan, Syria and touches the border with Saudi Arabia

    Area covered:

    12 km²

    Geography:

    The Azraq Oasis is a large mudflat located in the central and lowest part of the basin, 120 km North-East of Amman.

    Management:

    IUCN is working in partnership with the Jordan Badia Research and Development Center (BRDC), Arab Women Organization (AWO), and the Highland Water Forum.

    Start date:

    2008

  • Marj Sanour

    Marj Sanour

    The project aimed to support the demonstration of community-led planning of water resource management to help to improve the productivity of agricultural land and livelihood security. The project gives special emphasis to sustainable livelihoods, agricultural development and conjunctive use of ground and surface (run-off) water.

    Location:

    In the southern part of the Jenin Governorate, Palestine

    Geography:

    This is a mountainous area, where hills surround relatively flat plains and gentle sloping water paths.

    Management:

    IUCN worked in close collaboration with the Palestine Hydrological Group (an NGO) and the Union for Agricultural Work Committees (UAWC)

    Start date:

    2007

  • The project is working to empower Community Development Associations and local government agencies to develop tools for decision making at water-district level for the best use of water and agricultural resources in the Beni Sueif and Minia Governorates of the Nile Valley.

    Location:

    Beni-Suef and Minia in Egypt

    Area covered:

    10954 km²

    Geography:

    Beni Suef represents 1.09% of total Egypt's area with only 12% of the area inhabited, as the remaining area is desert. It is considered as an agriculture region and is on sloping terrain. Minia represents 3.23% of total Egypt's area with only 7.5% of the area inhabited while the remaining area is desert. It too is considered an agricultural region, although it is experiencing growing urbanisations.

    Management:

    IUCN is working in partnership with the Centre for Environment and Development for the Arab Region and Europe (CEDARE), the Coptic Evangelical Organization for Social Services (CEOSS) and CARE Egypt.

    Start date:

    2008

  • Tacana

    Tacana

    The project is about supporting pilot projects at the grassroots level to improve livelihoods through environmental conservation as well as facilitating bottom-up approaches to the governance of water resources. One of the long-term goals has been to encourage communities to self-organise to enhance their development opportunities.

    Location:

    Department of San Marcos, Guatemala, State of Chiapas, Mexico

    Area covered:

    3,170 km²

    Geography:

    The watersheds of the Tacaná volcano, which stands at an altitude of 4,093 meters, cover a transboundary area comprising the Coatán, Suchiate, Cosalapa and Cahoacán rivers in Guatemala and Mexico.

    Management:

    IUCN

    Start date:

    2004

  • Mekong

    Mekong

    The project focused on reforming water governance and demonstrating projects that produce livelihoods benefits. At the local level, IUCN supported the development and expansion of the Tai Baan network, villager-led action research which empowers local knowledge to engage with decision-making processes. IUCN also guided region-wide initiatives in water governance, including developing the M-POWER network and supporting the Mekong Region Waters Dialogues.

    Location:

    Cambodia, Lao PDR, Myanmar, Thailand, Vietnam and China’s Yunnan and Guangxi provinces

    Area covered:

    2.5 million km²

    Geography:

    The Mekong is the longest river in Southeast Asia, beginning its 4,200 km journey in the mountains of the Tibetan Plateau. From here, it flows through China, Lao PDR, Myanmar, Thailand, Cambodia and Viet Nam, finally reaching the South China Sea. The river and its numerous tributaries, backwaters, lakes, and swamps support many unique ecosystems and a wide range of globally-threatened species.

    Management:

    IUCN worked with the Mekong River Commission and UNDP

    Start date:

    2001

  • The project aimed to improve water governance through consensus on key water management principles and to institutionalise coordination mechanisms. Public participation, dialogue and negotiation between the government and civil society has been facilitated to achieve project goals. Simultaneously, support has been provided to strengthen institutions at all levels and the inter-connections between these institutions through the creation of a decision-support information base.

    Location:

    The Volta River Basin in West Africa covers six countries: Benin, Burkina Faso, Côte d’Ivoire, Ghana, Mali, and Togo. It is the ninth largest river basin in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Area covered:

    400,000 km²

    Geography:

    The basin is divided into four major sub-basins: the Black Volta, the White Volta, the Oti and the Lower Volta. The Volta Basin is home to nearly 19 million people who depend directly or indirectly on the resources of the river.

    Management:

    IUCN is working in partnership with national partners, including the Directorate of Water Resources in Burkina Faso, the Water Resources Commission in Ghana.

    Start date:

    2004

  • Pangani

    Pangani

    The project worked to implement effective monitoring and data collection systems to increase understanding of environmental, economic and social implications of different river flow scenarios under expected climatic conditions. The aim was to increase capacity to collect and analyze such flow assessment information. Simultaneously, IUCN and partners facilitated negotiations between stakeholders and increased community participation in water resource management.

    Location:

    Tanzania (95%)/Kenya (5%)

    Area covered:

    43,650 km²

    Geography:

    The river begins as a series of small streams draining from Mt. Kilimanjaro, Mt Meru and the Pare and Usambara mountain ranges and flows into the Indian Ocean.

    Management:

    IUCN worked in partnership with the Pangani River Basin Water Board.

    Start date:

    2003

  • Kadavu

    Kadavu

    The project is working with communities on the island of Kadavu to maintain and restore watershed catchments and to conserve ecosystem services. The focus is on establishing local governance structures as a demonstration of decentralization.

    Location:

    Nakasaleka (District) covers an area of 85 km2 of Kadavu Island

    Area covered:

    433 km²

    Geography:

    The maximum elevation of Nakasaleka is 622m whilst the mean elevation across the district is 142m, putting it at a higher altitude than the rest of the Tikina Distirct.

    Management:

    IUCN is working with the University of the South Pacific.

    Start date:

    2009

  • This project is working on demonstrating ecosystem based management approaches to support the implementation of improved water governance in Fiji. The focus is on establishing local governance structures as a demonstration of decentralization.

    Location:

    Fiji Islands

    Area covered:

    517 km²

    Geography:

    The area is covered with young volcanic rock as well as many types of older rocks scattered throughout the watershed area. The relative humidity in this area ranges between 60 and 80 per cent.

    Management:

    IUCN worked with the Fiji Government through the Department of Land and Water Resources Management (LWRM) and SOPAC (Secretariat for the Pacific Islands Applied Geoscience Commission)

    Start date:

    2009

  • Togitogiga

    Togitogiga

    This project is working to develop and implement a plan for rehabilitation and sustainable management of the catchment which will help to provide good water quality for the environment, local people and their livelihoods.

    Location:

    The Togitogiga Watershed is located in the Falealili district and the Siumu district on the southeast of the island of Upolu, Samoa

    Geography:

    The Togitogiga Catchment is the main source of water supply for residents of the villages of Poutasi, Saaga and Saleilua bordering the Togitogiga Recreational Reserve. It has its own unique biodiversity and well known for recreational purposes as part of the “Togitogiga Waterfalls”.

    Management:

    IUCN worked in partnership with Ministry of Natural Resources & Environment

    Start date:

    2008

  • Komadugu Yobe

    Komadugu Yobe

    The project is about creating a process of getting all players in the basin involved in the management of the land and water resources through coordination and cooperation. The long-term goal is the equitable and sustainable use of land and water resources of the Komadugu Yobe Basin (KYB).

    Location:

    North-eastern Nigeria and south-eastern Niger

    Area covered:

    148.000 km²

    Geography:

    KYB is a sub-basin of Lake Chad which is drained by two main river systems: the Yobe and the Komadugu

    Management:

    Joint initiative of the Nigeria Federal Ministry of Agriculture and Water Resources, the Nigerian Conservation Foundation and IUCN

    Start date:

    2005

  • Wami Ruvu

    Wami Ruvu

    The project is using the consensus-building approaches piloted in Pangani to set up Water User Associations (WUAs) and supporting the establishment of their legal status and registration with the Wami Ruvu Basin Water Office.

    Location:

    Tanzania

    Area covered:

    18,000 km²

    Geography:

    The Basin is in mostly low lying areas, except for the Uluguru Mountains in the extreme West.

    Management:

    IUCN is working with the Ministry of Water, Tanzania

    Start date:

    2008

  • The project is working to pilot the formation of Water Resource User Associations (WRUAs), through awareness raising and initial community consultations.

    Location:

    Lower Tana sub-catchment, Kenya

    Geography:

    The 700 kilometres long Tana River is the longest river in Kenya, and gives its name to the Tana River District. The river rises in the Aberdare Mountains to the west of Nyeri. Initially it runs east before turning south around the massif of Mount Kenya. It flows into the Indian Ocean at Ungwana Bay.

    Start date:

    2010

  • Balkhila

    Balkhila

  • Saro Valley

    Saro Valley

    Location:

    Pakistan

Outcomes

  • New national policies on water resources management developed or implemented in 6 countries with support from WANI in 5 river basins. National policies on water resources management incorporate democratization of decision making, environmental flows and/or the costs and benefits of ecosystem services for poor people.

  • Multi-stakeholder platforms empowered to reform governance of river basin management in 7 national and international basins. Charters and codes of conduct for coordinating and integrating management of water resources negotiated, resulting in conflict resolution, benefit sharing, new investment and restored ecosystem services.

  • Basin-level water management forums or basin organisations are accountable to new community-level institutions in 11 demonstration sites in 8 river basins in 30 countries. New community-led institutions are empowered to make decisions and represent local views and development priorities in higher level forums. 

  • New partnerships for sustainable development of water resources bridge old divides between environment, economy and poverty reduction in 9 basins. Dialogues on basin development bring diverse local communities, civil society, basin organisations and national economic decision makers together to jointly formulate and develop new mechanisms for water resource management. 

  • New international treaties signed or new institutions for trans-boundary cooperation established in 9 basins with WANI support. Support for dialogue and negotiation between States results in new mechanisms for trans-boundary cooperation on basin management. 

  • New income generating activities for poor people in 5 basins result from combining water resources management with enterprise development. Support for innovation in water resources management by local stakeholders creates new opportunities for development of small-scale enterprises that build value in communities from sustainable water management. 

  • Poor people obtain new assets for sustainable livelihoods to reduce poverty in communities in 7 basins in 11 countries. Pilot projects in demonstration sites utilise better management of ecosystem services to improve income, food security, water supply, health and nutrition, in combination with increased social capital and technical capacities, to reduce poverty in communities. 

  • Poor people are less vulnerable to climate risks and disaster because of environmental flows and restoration of ecosystem services in 5 basins. Environmental flows and restoration of ecosystems supports allocation of water to the environment and mitigation of flood and drought, to reduce livelihood risks for poor people. 

  • Toolkits drive innovation and scaling-up of successful water resources management that integrates ecosystem services, economics, incentives, governance reform and empowerment. Learning and networks build knowledge, ideas, and partnerships needed to empower stakeholders to innovate and manage change – for example using the WANI toolkits FLOW, VALUE, PAY and CHANGE. 

  • Major new financing commitments mobilise action on restoration and sustainable management in at least 4 countries. Sustainable financing mobilsed in Nigeria, Tanzania, Botswana, and Ecuador to support ongoing implementation of IWRM.