Submitted by guest blogger on Mon,11/14/2016

Building water infrastructure such as dams contributes to economic development, food, and energy security depending on their objective. In developing countries it is often seen as the most cost effective way to increase electricity production and irrigated agriculture. However, reaching these national objectives can often come at a cost to nature and local livelihoods which depend on healthy ecosystems. Modified river flows change the timing, quantity and quality of water flowing downstream. Yet, these constantly changing river flows are essential for livelihoods dependent on flood recession farming, floodplain cattle grazing, and fish production. Read more

Submitted by James Dalton on Mon,10/24/2016

Originally published in Global Water Forum, Monday 3 October 2016. To maximise downstream water quantity, you remove vegetation – all of it, including the trees. To counter rising carbon dioxide levels, you plant trees – lots of them. How should we do both?Read more

Submitted by guest blogger on Thu,04/28/2016

WISE-UP to Climate is a multi-partnership project focussing on natural infrastructure, water security and climate change adaptation in the Tana and Volta River Basins. Using an innovative approach to catalyse change on the ground, the project aims to demonstrate natural infrastructure as a 'nature-based solution' for climate change adaptation and sustainable development.Read more

Submitted by Mark Smith on Tue,03/22/2016

What does it take to include nature in investment porfolios to improve water security? Renat Heuberger, CEO of the South Pole Group, and Mark Smith, Director of the IUCN Global Water Programme, explore the options.Read more

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Submitted by guest blogger on Sat,03/19/2016

By Aaron Reuben of IUCN’s Forest and Climate Change Programme.

In late 2014 I attended a panel discussion on national infrastructure for improved water supplies. This was part of the ACES (A Community on Ecosystem Services) conference on Ecosystem Markets in Washington, DC. From the presentations and discussions, it emerged that there are three key ways to increase investment in natural infrastructure – ecosystems such as river basins, forests and wetlands which, together with ‘built infrastructure,’ are critical to maintaining water supply.Read more

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Submitted by Rebecca Welling on Tue,12/15/2015

Water for nature is too often sidelined in discussions around built water infrastructure development and subsequent water allocation needs. With increasing demands for food and energy production from a growing global population, many countries look to engineered solutions to bring them water, food and energy securityRead more

Submitted by guest blogger on Tue,12/15/2015

By Giulio Boccaletti and Lynn Scarlett of The Nature Conservancy, an IUCN member.

While the negotiations at the UN climate conference (COP21) in Paris have been deemed successful on many fronts, we are already witnessing the impacts of climate change on our most critical resource – water.Read more

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Submitted by Mark Smith on Tue,12/08/2015

Fire, earth, air and water. To the ancient Greeks, these were the keys to understanding the world around them. To modern-day climate negotiators? Not so much.Read more

Submitted by guest blogger on Wed,11/11/2015

Written by Peter Newborne, Research Associate Water Policy Programme, Overseas Development Institute-ODI

Access to water is crucial in arid and semi-arid regions. A key question is how far cities can require distant rural areas to provide water for their – growing – inhabitants.Read more

Submitted by James Dalton on Tue,10/27/2015

By James Dalton of IUCN’s Water Programme.

Around 40% of the world’s population lives in river basins that span two or more countries. These transboundary water systems include over 445 aquifers, more than 1,600 lakes and reservoirs, and 286 rivers. They are fundamental to the well-being of societies in terms of healthy people, healthy nature, and economic wealth. Yet population growth, climate change and a host of other threats are putting enormous pressure on these critical resources with far-reaching ramifications.Read more

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